How does children/teens playing violent video games affect the common good?

Question by Leda: How does children/teens playing violent video games affect the common good?
I am doing a HUGE project on controversies and I picked video game violence. We need to state how it impacts the common good and what the constitutional ideal/principle is.
My thesis is that I believe violent video games should be left alone by parents as it will not make their children extremely violent.

Best answer:

Answer by Britt
Violent games can and in some levels are used to train military forces and they protect our country.

What do you think? Answer below!

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5 Responses to How does children/teens playing violent video games affect the common good?

  1. Laila says:

    i think violent videogames make children desensitized to dangerous situations/issues of death and war. You can get bold with this and say we are raising little psychopaths and mention the spike in in-school shootings since 9/11 and the boom in war-oriented videogames

    thats just my input! you can go your own way too

  2. CycloneTH says:

    Well, the supposed effect by those who are against violent games is that playing violent video games will make those who play them violent. Of course anyone with any knowledge of history is aware this isn’t true. If you need to discuss the real effect you might discuss the use of violent games as an outlet for anger / frustration or something like that.

  3. Agent says:

    Violence has been around since long before GTA, Marylin Manson, and the Saw movies.

    If you’re prone to violence anyway, anything can set you off. People blame the above because it is easier than understanding how the human mind works. It is easier than admitting that they didn’t pay enough attention to their child’s moods. It is easier than admitting they did a bad job. It is easier than admitting that their kid has a mental illness.

    I’ve played violent video games since they existed and I’m fine. It gets my stress out at the end of a bad day.

  4. \Frank\ says:

    “Well, the supposed effect by those who are against violent games is that playing violent video games will make those who play them violent. Of course anyone with any knowledge of history is aware this isn’t true. If you need to discuss the real effect you might discuss the use of violent games as an outlet for anger / frustration or something like that.”

    Definitely do this. Give that person best answer.

  5. Slated Gray says:

    My personal experience with violent video games is that they are not as bad as everyone says they are. Though that’s not to say that these types of video games are okay for all children. My parents raised me, constantly telling me what was wrong and what was right. Of course I didn’t get it instantly but as time went on, I began to understood what was right and what was wrong. At that point I was also able to tell what was real and what wasn’t. Video games are not realistic, they’re a form of entertainment. I understood this as a child (not thoroughly but enough to know that what happens in video games does not happen in real life) because my parents reinforced good morals in me that allowed me to identify reality from fantasy.

    Ratings exist for a reason and it’s up to the parents to decide whether their child is mature enough to deal with the content presented. There can be a lot of things gained from video games other than just the negative aspects. The story line can be extremely well written, character analysis, character designing, etc. There’s so much more to the game than just entertainment, there’s a lot of thought put into these things and a kid can notice more than just what’s presented on the surface. Take GTA IV for example. It’s well known for it’s violent and sexual reputation but if you forget all the controversy, forget all the negative connotations it has, you might realize that is indeed a very intricate and detailed story line. You might not necessarily agree with the character’s actions or moral of the story but there’s still something to be learned. There’s a theme of loyalty and friendship in the story and the main character is not some womanizer (unless you make his fate be so). If you look at the game with negative expectations, you’ll only be seeing the negative aspects of it. There’s so much more that games have to offer than what their reputation states.

    With that said, video games should be considered carefully by the parent but they should not be deemed as something horrible if they have a negative reputation.

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